Eagle

Eagle flying

Eagle flying over a lake in western Colorado

Thin winter
air under
my wings,
I adjust my
tail to circle
the frozen
pond, eyeing
the snowy
shore, is
that an unwary
rabbit? The
hunger, ever
the hunger,
Dive!

This was a point of view poem from the November Poem a Day Challenge,

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Richard As Clown Giclee Print by Linda Armstrong at Art.com

 

 

 

Richard As Clown Giclee Print by Linda Armstrong at Art.com.

In the nineties, I painted many figurative works. Some of them were done at the Barnsdall Art Center in Hollywood. Others were done in private groups. This was one of my favorite models. He was a retired dancer who had been featured on the cover of Dance Magazine. He was very gifted and had a wonderful flair for costume and set design. I painted his setup at another artist’s studio in a day-long shared model session. There are two paintings in the set. Each is about 30″ x 30″. They were done in acrylic on canvas, and I had a wonderful time!

Oh, Oh, Oh!

ooo by bluerabbit
card at Zazzle
This is one of three large acrylic paintings on canvas done to fit the theme of a contemporary art show in a local gallery. The theme was "Text."

At the time, I had just finished the manuscript for my phonics book, "ABC, Follow Me!" The book concerns itself with the shapes of letters as well as the sounds they represent. It also includes a number of craft projects to teach these shapes. In short, I had letters on my mind.

I started the first painting with an elaborate concept, but it just wasn't working, so I let it dry and moved to another. The same thing happened. The deadline was approaching, and I didn't know what to do.

Then, I decided to use letters as English words. I painted each of the large canvases with a different pure hue. I started with I, I, I, I; moved to three U's ("Oh lucky You"), which add another layer, as they suggest horseshoes. The one shown here is "Oh, Oh, Oh". It calls to mind the famous joke:

A first grade teacher comes out to the parking lot and sees her bumper dented. Then she fumes, "Oh, oh, oh! Look, look, look! Darn, darn, darn!

Recently, I used the concept I developed with these paintings in a demonstration for school children. We made paintings on bright hues if single letters.

Still Life

Orange by bluerabbit
Other posters from zazzle.com
I did this painting as a demonstration for school children. Betty Edwards has a great recommendation in Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. She says to create a one-object still life. She uses potatoes and bits of ribbon. I like fruit. I had a bag of oranges at home, so this orange is what I used.

This is a great painting problem for artists of all ages and stages. There is a lot of room for stylistic interpretation.

The Butterfly Effect

Inspired by a challenge on Red Bubble and based upon my extremely limited understanding of Chaos Theory, this digital work began as a tiny portion of an original photograph. I enlarged my selection, changed the colors, mirrored it twice, filtered it multiple times, and changed the colors again. The bird just appeared.

Emergence

A couple of years ago, I cut individual words from magazine pages and put them in a plastic bag. I pulled one out at the beginning of each work session. This painting was inspired by the word "Emergence".

It is filled with mysterious images and intricate passages with subtle color interactions. The original painting is 16 x 20" and was done in acrylic on canvas. The print is available on several different kinds of paper, and also on canvas.

Night Clouds

To create this demonstration painting for school children at the Western Colorado Center for the Arts, I began by reading the poem “Night Clouds” by Amy Lowell. I asked the students to name their favorite images (word pictures) from the work. This particular group chose the “vermillion tongue” of the rising sun. Students took turns painting red tongues on the blank canvas. Between sessions, I added more color to the images and layered them with glazes that included various shades of reds and orange. The kids loved the poem and I enjoyed sharing the experience.