Inspiration!

Poet's Calendar 2010 by bluerabbit
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Here is a calendar I put together a couple of years ago. Each month has a simple poetry challenge. Flip through the virtual pages to find something you like. Think of this as a call from your muse.
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Kirk at Work

While attending a performance of the local symphony, I made some quick sketches of the conductor in action.

A couple of weeks later, as part of a painting demonstration for school children, I pulled the drawings out of my purse. I did this quick painting to show students that you can make drawings at any time and use them later in a composition.

If you teach,

1. Encourage students to fold a sheet of newsprint or recycled white paper once in either direction.

2. Tell them to carry the paper, along with a short pencil, in a pocket for a day.

3. Encourage students to make at least three quick sketches.

4. Allow them time to create a color version of the drawing.

5. Use crayon, tempera, torn paper, textures from magazines, or watercolor to create the composition.

6. Emphasize that the sketch is just a starting place.

Improvisational Abstracts

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Improv on the Street

I painted this abstract acrylic on canvas while listening to live jazz at Grand Junction’s popular annual street festival. It’s part of my improvisational series. I enjoy allowing a work to reveal itself . I haven’t had time to paint since Spring Art Week, but it’s instructive to look back at previous work.

Still Life

Orange by bluerabbit
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I did this painting as a demonstration for school children. Betty Edwards has a great recommendation in Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. She says to create a one-object still life. She uses potatoes and bits of ribbon. I like fruit. I had a bag of oranges at home, so this orange is what I used.

This is a great painting problem for artists of all ages and stages. There is a lot of room for stylistic interpretation.

Electricity in Blue

I love this series of expressionist works. I begin each one with a random element, such as a word chosen from a printed source, background music, or a brushstroke contributed by an onlooker. I then add more thick paint, or a glaze and see what the canvas has to tell me.

This particular piece was featured in a beautiful short film called “Lumenis” by Brazilian composer and filmmaker Bernardo Uzeda. (http://bernardouzeda.kinghost.net/)